“Resurrection”


I have definitely been remiss in my posts.  With the holidays, and my reentry into University my time has waned quite considerably.  I do apologize for my lack of updates and posts, especially to those of you who follow regularly or subscribe via Kindle…it truly is not fair to you who are paying for monthly content and not receiving it.  If you’ll stay on board a few months longer I do promise to up the post count by providing (hopefully) quality posts that’ll draw in more readers and keep the ones that have always supported me.

As a sort of symbolic gesture I give you “Resurrection.”  I have never been one to enjoy poetry, but this last quarter I was required to an introductory poetry course at Eastern Washington University that really opened my eyes.  I fell in love with T.S. Eliot…and hard.  “The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock” is magnificent, and after reading it you open up to the world a little bit more than you were before.  Others also caught my eye and others I will always be disdainful of, but in the end I had garnished a bit of appreciation for the art which has led me to the writing of some of my own poetry.

Personally, I find my foray to be a bit shallow, but I am trying to improve.  “Resurrection” is the first hopefully many shallow forays, but for the content of the preface I think it fits quite wonderfully.  Read, comment, and enjoy.

“Resurrection”

His Walther PPK loosely holstered and licensed
A weathered Q Branch hidden with gadgets
to aid in his explosive endeavors;

Globetrotting to gather women–
left garbless & satisfied
they strike and parry in lust

Till the sky fell he was flat,
and
while he slowly declined the world became…
not enough.

The women fade under forgotten title screens
And, now he is grizzled and worn.
But
like his chief hobby

The Double-O is Reborn

Review: Carte Blanche by Jeffrey Deaver


Carte Blanche (James Bond)Carte Blanche by Jeffery Deaver

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Since Ian Fleming’s death in 1964 numerous writers have taken up the task of penning James Bond novels in an effort to keep the Fleming and Bond legacy alive and well. Some of these authors have had lengthy runs that have allowed them to frame out their version of the titular character with years of careful growth, however, others have had only a mere moment to make their mark on the famous character. Suffice it to say, some of these authors have been more successful than others, because of their respective opportunities.

In particular, I enjoyed John Gardner’s James Bond series, which primarily spanned the 1980’s, as well as Raymond Benson’s more-American take on the most-British of spies.
Recently, the popular fiction author, Jeffrey Deaver, was plucked from the ranks to write the latest 007 novel and on the whole I think he does the series justice. He does not take any chances, but he does hold true to the character and the universe which I think will appease fans but in the end deny them poignancy and relevance.

Deaver begins by taking Bond and bumping him into the twenty-first Century. By doing this, Deaver effectively alters the rules and the environment to create a new stomping ground for Bond to partake in, and because of this drastic change small facets of Bond’s backstory were changed but nothing that compromises the character. Besides these few details Deaver doesn’t really change anything else about the James Bond universe. He stays fairly grounded in the lore, and merely uses the revised setting to make a contemporary tale. As far as research is concerned it probably relieved some potential stress for Deaver as well. All things considering, it is an intelligent decision.

Interestingly enough the plot takes places over the course of a single week. It is quick and seamless. Each scene transitions smoothly to the next and it rarely has slow points because of its rapidity. Also, like most (if not all) James Bond plots, it trots the globe. The introduction takes place in Serbia and finally ends in Sudan with stops in Dubai and of course the United Kingdom.

The first several chapters follow James Bond as he thwarts an Irish hit man from derailing a train and polluting the Danube. This seemingly secluded incident then traces back to the villainous Severan Hydt and a much deeper plot that Bond must unravel before the death toll mounts. Hydt has an affinity for death. He enjoys it so much that he photographs it in order to get off on it privately. Severan is truly a villainous character that fits in to Bond’s wheelhouse of world dominators to a ‘T.’

The plot takes countless twists and turns and introduces various faces; some are familiar, while others are fresh takes on espionage archetypes. In the end and in traditional Jeffrey Deaver fashion, the conclusion is not so neatly sewn up as it may seem. There are numerous twists in the last fifty pages or so, but all-in-all, the good guys win the day and Bond has something left to ponder.

Carte Blanche” is not the best James Bond book ever written, nor is it the worst. It fires on all necessary cylinders to function accordingly, but it does not go above and beyond. It doesn’t push the boundaries, and unfortunately I think it will be easily forgettable a couple years down the line. With this in mind “Carte Blanche” receives three-and-a-half stars out of five.

“Carte Blanche” is not as in depth as a John le Carré or Joseph Kanon’s novels, but it gets the job done. It is a quick read, and the characters (whether new or not) seem familiar to the reader. Deaver pays homage to Fleming, while simultaneously holding true to his own form.

(SOURCE: Review: Carte Blanche by Jeffrey Deaver)

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“Skyfall” poster from AllPosters.com


I am a huge James Bond, and recently I had the pleasure of seeing “Skyfall” in theaters with my longtime girlfriend, Celeste Sievers.  I haven’t been to the theaters to see a Bond film with her, so for me it was a sort of silly bonding moment–nevertheless I was ecstatic!  As far as the reviews are concerned–they are correct.  “Skyfall” is the best James Bond film to date, and I hope to have a corroborating review within the fortnight.

In honor of a tradition started by my lovely parents, I have continued onward with my collection of James Bond posters.  Beginning with Daniel Craig‘s run at “Casino Royale” I have framed the past two movie posters, which are up in my apartment along a wall.  To keep with this, I recently ordered my “Skyfall” poster (featured left), and I hope to have a picture up showing the three framed side-by-side as soon as possible.

If you haven’t checked out Allposters.com I would highly recommend you do so.  They sell a spectacular range of prints for very reasonable prices–along with framing services.  Also, every time I have ordered a poster from them there has always been a discount offered at checkout, whether it be free (or discounted) shipping or discounted posters there was always a promotional code available.  And, in this instance, it fit my James Bond tradition incredibly perfectly.

Cheers, to all the James Bond-o-philes and readers, and have a happy Thanksgiving if I don’t post before then!

“The Race” by Clive Cussler


The RaceThe Race by Clive Cussler

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Clive Cussler is most known for his action-adventure novels, especially those starring his reoccurring character, Dirk Pitt. However, several years back Cussler released his first Isaac Bell novel titled, “The Chase.” Isaac Bell is the lead private detective in the fictional Van Dorn Detective Agency. He is quick-witted, brave, intuitive, tall, blonde-hair, a crack shot, and everything else Ian Fleming would of thought while constructing James Bond.

The Isaac Bell novels take place in the late 19th/early 20th centuries and are always centered on a particularly cunning villain that Isaac Bell has to tangle with throughout the tale. The narrative usually flips back and forth between the two leads, and even though the antagonist essentially embodies evil Cussler manages to round them out making them quite interesting to read about. And, truth be told, Isaac does not always get the better of the villains, which in the end makes for a great read.

In “The Race” Cussler focus on the birth of the airplane. In a story that pans the continent during the height of a newspaper endorsed monoplane/biplane race Isaac Bell must protect the race’s underdog from her murderous brute of a husband, Harry Frost, while simultaneously trying to figure out who is behind the sabotage of the other participants planes.

The book is a fun romp through early 20th century America, while focusing on the classic ‘whodunit’ recipe. The atmosphere can be described as whimsical and thus creates a quick, enjoyable read. I don’t know of too many fictional pre-WWI novels and because this era interests me so greatly I am pleased that Cussler has filled in the void, some what, and produced a fun novel that will interest just about anyone who likes solid action-adventure novels.

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